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As science is not situated outside of society, as Philippe Grandcolas argues, the value of research is linked to a market. More precisely, discoveries that are easily understandable (tradable) will advance much more one’s career. If one studies a bird or a mammal, one will have more success than if one studies insects. This is a result of our anthropocentric worldview. The insect are seen as strange, they are rarely seen as positive and sympathetic. The western view on living beings is anthropocentric, putting man on top of the world in an ancient biblical way. But in reality there is not a more evolved species, everything is extremely adapted to their situation. Man should not be put on top, nor should some species be put on a higher level than others. This view serves mankind badly, because it doesn’t give him a view that is broad enough of living beings, and avoids to give answers to some questions that are urgent. This is not only a theoretical and ethical problem, it is also a practical problem. If we know well the living things, we will know more about mankind itself.

expert

  • Philippe Grandcolas

date

21/11/2015

location

Musée de l’Homme, Paris

is a director of research at the CNRS, at the Institute of Systematics, Evolution and Biodiversity. He is an evolutionary systematist, whose research focuses on the biodiversity of the Global South and particularly on the life of insect species.

— INQUIRY: On becoming earthlings
— PRODUCTION: Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— EVENT: On becoming earthlings: dialogues and exercises in shrinking and expanding the human

is a director of research at the CNRS, at the Institute of Systematics, Evolution and Biodiversity. He is an evolutionary systematist, whose research focuses on the biodiversity of the Global South and particularly on the life of insect species.

— INQUIRY: On becoming earthlings
— PRODUCTION: Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— EVENT: On becoming earthlings: dialogues and exercises in shrinking and expanding the human

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