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The anthropocene is generally defined as the era where the impact of human activities has become as strong as a geological force. Nature, in contrast, was classicaly understood as the territory and the sum of forces that have been existing before and independently of human activities and which are the opposite or the counterpart of culture. Now, the universality of the anthropocene claim leads to the assumption that this opposition between nature and culture can't be upheld any more, because there was no spot left on earth that was not directly or indirectly affected by the aftermath of human activities. But if "nature" doesn't exist any more, whom are we going to protect? And what sense does it make to mix up the long time frames of nature and earth and the short time frames of human history in the first place? Catherine Larrère takes up questions like these when discussing the contradictions and findings in the discourses of the anthropocene.

expert

  • Catherine Larrère

date

21/11/2015

location

Musée de l’Homme, Paris

is an emeritus professor at the University of Paris-Sorbonne, She specializes in moral and political philosophy. She focuses on political and ethical questions in relation with the environmental crisis and new technologies. She is the president of the Foundation for Political Ecology (FEP).

— INQUIRY: On becoming earthlings
) — PRODUCTION: Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— EVENT: On becoming earthlings: dialogues and exercises in shrinking and expanding the human

is an emeritus professor at the University of Paris-Sorbonne, She specializes in moral and political philosophy. She focuses on political and ethical questions in relation with the environmental crisis and new technologies. She is the president of the Foundation for Political Ecology (FEP).

— INQUIRY: On becoming earthlings
) — PRODUCTION: Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— EVENT: On becoming earthlings: dialogues and exercises in shrinking and expanding the human

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