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WITHIN 1 is a collaborative project investigating how deafness can influence the way we understand sound performance, its space and instrumentation.

For the Bergen Assembly, WITHIN culminates in a new chapter for which Tarek Atoui has developed nine new instruments that expand notions of listening beyond the aural. The design of these instruments and their playability are the result of workshops and collaborations between the artist, instrument makers, deaf and non-deaf students and volunteers. These instruments were made progressively, as the result of exhibitions and residencies that Tarek Atoui initiated in several institutions in the Unites States, France and Germany, where he met acoustic instrument makers, speaker designers, software engineers and musicians — all contributors to the making of this ensemble.

In September 2016, the instruments will be brought together for the first time in Sentralbadet where composers and performers will be invited to experiment with them in different ways, playing them separately or as an ensemble.

Each week, a guest composer will be commissioned to conduct public rehearsals and to present a final concert.

THE SUBBASS PROTOTONE - Johannes Goebel2

The SubBass Prototone is a 2 x 2 x 2 m organ pipe that one can enter and play from inside. Designed by Johannes Goebel in the 1980s, it is a giant a Helmholtz resonator and the frequency range of this analog wind machine is at the bottom end of hearing, where one can only experience sound by feeling it with the hands or the body. Helmholtz resonance is the phenomenon of air resonance in a cavity, such as when one blows across the top of an empty bottle. The name comes from a device created in the 1850s by Hermann von Helmholtz, the Helmholtz resonator, which he used to identify the various frequencies or musical pitches present in music and other complex sounds.

THE 0.9 - Tarek Atoui, Greg Niemeyer, Perrin Meyer, Jeff Lubow3

The 0.9 is a networked group of nine Meyer subwoofers speakers encased by 3 platforms on which performers stand. It has a gestural interface inspired by sign language and is similar to a Theremin. Through specific hands and finger movements, the player produces ultra-low-frequency sounds that are physically felt, perhaps even before they are heard. The instrument allows to play with resonance frequencies of the space where it’s being performed. The space and its architecture therefore become conductors of sound, and the audience can perceive the instrument through them.

4 ITERATIONS ON DRUMS - Thierry Madiot4

4 Iterations on Drums, is a set of percussion tables that focus on conducting sound through solid materials such as metal and wood rather than air. This way, the sound they produce is felt in the hands of the player before reaching the ears. Initially imagined by Thierry Madiot, the design of these tables was enhanced by students at the Nordahl Grieg high-school in Bergen. Madiot then took the students designs and finalized the instrument at Lutheries Urbaines in Paris.

THE SUB-INK - Julia Alsarraf5

The Sub-ink is a set of four units with a single subwoofer each on which the performer sits in contact with the sound. By touching an ink drawing the musician previously prepares, he / she plays a basic synthesizer in rhythmic or melodic ways. The Sub-Ink is a modular instrument that can be used to control other device such as computers and synthesizers, and to connect and synchronize musicians with different hearing abilities.

THE TRUE LAPTOP - Quartet Mats Lindström 6

The True Laptop Quartet is a set of four tactile instruments that use metallic found objects, transducer speakers and old microphones to create feedback sounds. These objects are placed onto the lap of the performer who feels the sound in his/her hands or body through the vibrations of metal.
A transducer speaker is a speaker that mounts directly not surfaces like wood, glass or steel making them vibrate and conduct sound.

THE T1 - Daniel Araya 7

The T1 is a MIDI keyboard which sounds can be heard in a tactile way. This controller easily connects to any type of musical software to play and process sounds the player choses. It can also be used as a speaker that allows to perceive up to 5 sounds in the fingers and the palm of the hand.

THE OUROBOROS - Espen Sommer Eide8

The Ouroboros is an instrument where sound is formed inside the mouth of the player. Conceived by Espen Sommer Eide, it is developed in discussion with persons of different hearing abilities. The player places a speaker on the throat and is therefore in direct contact with the sound of the instrument. He / she then stands in front of a set of microphones. By closing and opening the mouth, and without emitting sound, the player modulates and controls resonance and feedback frequencies between the speaker and the microphone.

33 SOFT CELLS - Kvadrat and Tarek Atoui9

33 Soft Cells is a touch sampler made out 33 touch sensitive textile panels. Each panel has a distinctive texture or pattern. The instrument can be connected to different computer software and types of sound, and playing it relies on the sense of touch rather then auditive or visual stimuli.
With the support of BEK, composer Kari Telstad Sundet will create a specific software for the instrument. Throughout the summer of 2016, Sundet will be collecting the sounds of her software on recording sessions with individuals of different ages and hearing abilities from Bergen.

THE SOUND MASSAGE KIT - Thierry Madiot10

This kit is a synthesis of Madiot’s 16 years of work with sound massage techniques and practices to expand our experience of sound, through the ears or through the body. This kit is more then an instrument. It can be used therapeutically, recreationally, artistically and/ or pedagogically, and functions as a device where several persons play for one listener laying on a special table.

CONCEPT

  • Tarek Atoui

WITH

  • Julia Alsarraf
  • Daniel Araya
  • Hein B. Bjerck
  • André Bratten
  • Johannes Goebel
  • Mats Lindström
  • Trond Lossius
  • Jeffrey M. Lubow
  • Thierry Madiot
  • Perrin Meyer
  • Greg Niemeyer
  • Alwynne Pritchard
  • Espen Sommer Eide
  • Gerhard Stäbler
  • Pauline Oliveros
  • Kari Telstad Sundet

IMAGE

  • WITHIN. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.

develops a structural approach to sound art which goes beyond the performance context. His processual and collaborative projects include composing sound works and making musical instruments. On and from Tarab (begun in 2011) brings together a group of musicians who revisit tarab, which designates both the traditional music form and the effect the music produces on the listener. Within (begun in 2009) is an in situ project on the city of Sharjah, which includes work with the Al Amal School for Deaf Students. Dahlem Session (begun in 2013) involves making new instruments based on music played with traditional instruments of unknown origin.

is a Troy-based artist. She graduated from Rensselaer in 2012.

was born in Sweden in 1976 and is a musician, inventor and instrument builder that specializes in analog syn- thesizers and multi channel sound installations. He works as the studio engineer at EMS studios in Stockholm, plays improvised electronic music and has a big interest in mechanics, optics and electronics.
Araya has built instruments and installations in collaboration with different artists such as Mark Fell, Kim Hedås and Halldór Úlfarsson as well as custom synthesizers for himself. During the last few years he has experimented with different materials and techniques using CNC-machines, computer controlled mills, that gives the possibility of almost industrial precision in one off objects as well as very fast prototyping times for new ideas.

is head of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) study program in archaeology. Besides contemporary archaeology, his is main academic focus is Stone Age studies ranging from lithic traditions, phenomenological perspectives on cave paintings to international studies of early human-sea relation and colonization processes in seascapes. He is the leader of “Marine Ventures” – a comparative study of marine foragers in the seascapes of Scandinavia and Argentinean Patagonia.

is a Norwegian electron- ica musician, composer and producer. He had his album debut with ”Be A Man You Ant” in 2013, and he was awarded Spellemannsprisen (the Norwegian ”Grammy Award”) for his 2015 album “Gode”. He has toured Europe extensively, and new compositions have been commissioned by the Ultima Festival in Oslo and Ekko Festival in Bergen.

is the founding director of the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA, since 2002. EMPAC is a unique building and program designed specifically at the intersection of artistic productions,scientific research, digital technology and our human realm of experience. Between 1990 and 2002, Johannes Goebel was the founding director of the Institute for Musik and Acoustics at the Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, Germany. A center for art and media, the ZKM is an international forum for experimental productions, research and exhibitions in the fields of art, science, and technology. In both institutions, Johannes Goebel was deeply involved with the architecture, infrastructure and artistic programming. He worked internationally as composer, curator, music educator, instrument builder, researcher and lecturer on the aesthetic implications of digital technology in the arts.

works as a composer and a musician, often with strains of live-electronics and with live performance, intermedia, scenic elements and visual arts as a complement to the music. He has worked both with music for theatre, opera, radio-art and dance and with sound installations. Formerly an engineer in the electronics industry he has designed and constructed a number of unique electronic musical instruments and apparatuses. He has worked with children and amateurs as performers in several projects. Since 2004 he is the artistic director of EMS, Elektronmusikstudion in Stockholm.

is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher concerned with the space between body and technology. His influences are spread amongst a number of mentors and colleagues and collaborators the likes of David Wessel, Adrian Freed, Leslie Stuck, John Bischoff, Pauline Oliveros, and Patrick Clancy. Jeffrey studied conceptual art at KCAI, and electronic music practice at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since, he has occupied positions in research and development with various organizations the likes of Cycling ‘74, Starkey Hearing Research Center, and the Hafter Auditory Perception Lab (HAPL). In 2008, Jeffrey commenced a research position at The Center for New Music and Audio Technologies (CNMAT) at UC Berkeley, focusing on instrument building, music technology, pedagogy, and computer science.

is a French sound artist, born 1963 and living in Paris. He is an inventor of instruments and collector of accessories, trombonist, performer of contemporary music and improviser. He has also developed several acoustic installations. As a musician he has led and participated in a number of concerts, ensembles, festivals and recordings. Artistic Director of “Lutherie Urbaine” in Paris since 2013. He has been a part of the “Instants Chavirés” team since the beginning in 1991, organizing concerts, performances and festivals. He established the “Sound Massages” in 2001, and has developed a wide range of techniques and practices that expand our corporeal experience of sound.

is a graduate of Berkeley High, Columbia College, and the Courant Institute at NYU, where he studied physics and math. He works for the family business, Meyer Sound Laboratories, where he designs digital audio signal processing algorithms. He also performs research in computational acoustics in collaboration with research groups including CNMAT at UC Berkeley, the Courant Mathematics and Computing Lab at NYU, and The Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University.

studied Classics and Photography. He started working with new media when he arrived in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1992. He received his MFA from Stanford University in New Media in 1997. At the same time, he founded the Stanford University Digital Art Center. In 2001 was appointed at UC Berkeley as a Professor for New Media. He is involved in the Center for New Media, focusing on the critical analysis of the impact of new media on human experiences. His creative work focuses on the mediation between individuals, communities and environments. Selected projects include Gravity (Cooper Union, NYC, 1997), PING (SFMOMA, 2001), Oxygen Flute (SJMA, 2002), Ping 2.0 (Paris, La Villette Numerique, 2004), Organum Playtest (BAMPFA 2005), Good Morning Flowers (SFIFF 2006, Townhouse Gallery, Cairo, Egypt, 2006), Maldives Pavillion (Venice Biennale, 2013), gnosisong (CCD Mexico City, 2015) blackcloud.org, sevenairs.org, polartide. org, gifcollider.com and tsarbell.com.

is an artist, performer and composer. She studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London and has a PhD from the University of Bristol. Her compositions and performances have been heard across Europe, America and Indonesia and she has worked with leading musicians and ensembles across the globe. In 2015 she formed the music-theatre company Neither Nor with her partner Thorolf Thuestad. From 2008 and until March 2014, Alwynne was Artistic Director of the Borealis festival in Bergen and from 2001 until 2008, she taught composition at Trinity College of Music in London. Alwynne also worked for many years as a freelance writer and presenter for BBC Radio 3. In January 2016, she took up the position of Artistic Director of the BIT20 Ensemble.

is a musician and artist from Tromsø, currently based in Bergen. With the projects Alog and Phonophani he became a prominent representatives of experimental electronic music from Norway, with a string of releases on the label Rune Grammofon. He has also produced a series of site-specific pieces and artworks. These projects include a multichannel composition for the 50-year anniversary of the completion of the chapel of Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp, France, and a special ‘Building Instruments’ performance at the 2008 Manifesta Biennial. He has had solo exhibitions Dead Language Poetry at Bergen Kunsthall 2013 and The Weed Archive at Nikolaj Kunsthal 2015. Eide has also been involved in a series of art projects associated with topics relating to the Barents and Arctic regions of Northern Norway and Russia, including commissions for the Neiden museum (‘Language Memory’) and the University of Tromsø (‘Material Vision – Silent Reading’), Dark Ecology (Sonic Acts) and the ongoing experiments of the ‘Rural Reading Room’ events in the area.
In addition to making music and art, Eide has also been directing the Trollofon electronic music festival in Bergen (2001-2006), and worked as artistic developer at BEK (Bergen Center of Electronic Arts). He is a member of theatre-collective Verdensteatret with works performed at the Shanghai Biennial, Exit festival Paris, BAM New York and more.

Since the 1980s, Gerhard Stäbler he has initiated and directed festivals for contemporary music in the Ruhr area, and large scale projects in public spaces and industrial environments (e.g. in New York, Porto, Chicago, Trier, Düsseldorf, Kiev, Vilnius an Würzburg). He was artistic director of the 1995 World Music Days of the ISCM, held in the Ruhr. His works has been commissioned by orchestras, choirs, ensembles and soloists, by broadcasters and theatres around the world. He has been composer in residence and visiting professor at many institutions in North and South America, in Australia, as well as in the Middle and Far East. A series of awards, prizes and scholarships (e.g. Cornelius-Cardew Memorial-Prize, The Japan Foundation scholarship, Duisburger Musikpreis 2003). In 2015 the first English language book on the compositional work of Gerhard Stäbler was published by the American musicologist Paul Attinello. In Bergen Assembly 2016, the new commission ”Dancing Senses” will be premiered by Gerhard Stäbler and the BIT20 ensemble.

is a composer, performer, humanitarian and senior figure in contemporary American music, whose work with improvisation, meditation, electronic music, myth and ritual has profoundly influenced experimentation in music from the 1960s onward. Awarded the John Cage Award in 2012 from the Foundation of Contemporary Arts, Pauline is Distinguished Research Professor of Music at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, and Darius Milhaud Artist-in-Residence at Mills College. She is the founder of “Deep Listening,” also her life practice. In 1989, John Cage remarked: “Through Pauline Oliveros and Deep Listening, I finally know what harmony is... It’s about the pleasure of making music.”

is a composer from Averøya in Western Norway. She has her BA and MA in composition from the Grieg Academy, University in Bergen. She spent one year of her studies at the Chopin Academy in Warsaw. The recent years she has been focusing on what happens in the intersection between electronics and acoustic instruments, and on the visual nature of sound through the creation of sonic landscapes and images.

This collection was initiated in the frame of the exhibition WITHIN / Infinite Ear, Bergen Assembly 2016

develops a structural approach to sound art which goes beyond the performance context. His processual and collaborative projects include composing sound works and making musical instruments. On and from Tarab (begun in 2011) brings together a group of musicians who revisit tarab, which designates both the traditional music form and the effect the music produces on the listener. Within (begun in 2009) is an in situ project on the city of Sharjah, which includes work with the Al Amal School for Deaf Students. Dahlem Session (begun in 2013) involves making new instruments based on music played with traditional instruments of unknown origin.

is a Troy-based artist. She graduated from Rensselaer in 2012.

was born in Sweden in 1976 and is a musician, inventor and instrument builder that specializes in analog syn- thesizers and multi channel sound installations. He works as the studio engineer at EMS studios in Stockholm, plays improvised electronic music and has a big interest in mechanics, optics and electronics.
Araya has built instruments and installations in collaboration with different artists such as Mark Fell, Kim Hedås and Halldór Úlfarsson as well as custom synthesizers for himself. During the last few years he has experimented with different materials and techniques using CNC-machines, computer controlled mills, that gives the possibility of almost industrial precision in one off objects as well as very fast prototyping times for new ideas.

is head of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) study program in archaeology. Besides contemporary archaeology, his is main academic focus is Stone Age studies ranging from lithic traditions, phenomenological perspectives on cave paintings to international studies of early human-sea relation and colonization processes in seascapes. He is the leader of “Marine Ventures” – a comparative study of marine foragers in the seascapes of Scandinavia and Argentinean Patagonia.

is a Norwegian electron- ica musician, composer and producer. He had his album debut with ”Be A Man You Ant” in 2013, and he was awarded Spellemannsprisen (the Norwegian ”Grammy Award”) for his 2015 album “Gode”. He has toured Europe extensively, and new compositions have been commissioned by the Ultima Festival in Oslo and Ekko Festival in Bergen.

is the founding director of the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA, since 2002. EMPAC is a unique building and program designed specifically at the intersection of artistic productions,scientific research, digital technology and our human realm of experience. Between 1990 and 2002, Johannes Goebel was the founding director of the Institute for Musik and Acoustics at the Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, Germany. A center for art and media, the ZKM is an international forum for experimental productions, research and exhibitions in the fields of art, science, and technology. In both institutions, Johannes Goebel was deeply involved with the architecture, infrastructure and artistic programming. He worked internationally as composer, curator, music educator, instrument builder, researcher and lecturer on the aesthetic implications of digital technology in the arts.

works as a composer and a musician, often with strains of live-electronics and with live performance, intermedia, scenic elements and visual arts as a complement to the music. He has worked both with music for theatre, opera, radio-art and dance and with sound installations. Formerly an engineer in the electronics industry he has designed and constructed a number of unique electronic musical instruments and apparatuses. He has worked with children and amateurs as performers in several projects. Since 2004 he is the artistic director of EMS, Elektronmusikstudion in Stockholm.

is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher concerned with the space between body and technology. His influences are spread amongst a number of mentors and colleagues and collaborators the likes of David Wessel, Adrian Freed, Leslie Stuck, John Bischoff, Pauline Oliveros, and Patrick Clancy. Jeffrey studied conceptual art at KCAI, and electronic music practice at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since, he has occupied positions in research and development with various organizations the likes of Cycling ‘74, Starkey Hearing Research Center, and the Hafter Auditory Perception Lab (HAPL). In 2008, Jeffrey commenced a research position at The Center for New Music and Audio Technologies (CNMAT) at UC Berkeley, focusing on instrument building, music technology, pedagogy, and computer science.

is a French sound artist, born 1963 and living in Paris. He is an inventor of instruments and collector of accessories, trombonist, performer of contemporary music and improviser. He has also developed several acoustic installations. As a musician he has led and participated in a number of concerts, ensembles, festivals and recordings. Artistic Director of “Lutherie Urbaine” in Paris since 2013. He has been a part of the “Instants Chavirés” team since the beginning in 1991, organizing concerts, performances and festivals. He established the “Sound Massages” in 2001, and has developed a wide range of techniques and practices that expand our corporeal experience of sound.

is a graduate of Berkeley High, Columbia College, and the Courant Institute at NYU, where he studied physics and math. He works for the family business, Meyer Sound Laboratories, where he designs digital audio signal processing algorithms. He also performs research in computational acoustics in collaboration with research groups including CNMAT at UC Berkeley, the Courant Mathematics and Computing Lab at NYU, and The Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University.

studied Classics and Photography. He started working with new media when he arrived in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1992. He received his MFA from Stanford University in New Media in 1997. At the same time, he founded the Stanford University Digital Art Center. In 2001 was appointed at UC Berkeley as a Professor for New Media. He is involved in the Center for New Media, focusing on the critical analysis of the impact of new media on human experiences. His creative work focuses on the mediation between individuals, communities and environments. Selected projects include Gravity (Cooper Union, NYC, 1997), PING (SFMOMA, 2001), Oxygen Flute (SJMA, 2002), Ping 2.0 (Paris, La Villette Numerique, 2004), Organum Playtest (BAMPFA 2005), Good Morning Flowers (SFIFF 2006, Townhouse Gallery, Cairo, Egypt, 2006), Maldives Pavillion (Venice Biennale, 2013), gnosisong (CCD Mexico City, 2015) blackcloud.org, sevenairs.org, polartide. org, gifcollider.com and tsarbell.com.

is an artist, performer and composer. She studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London and has a PhD from the University of Bristol. Her compositions and performances have been heard across Europe, America and Indonesia and she has worked with leading musicians and ensembles across the globe. In 2015 she formed the music-theatre company Neither Nor with her partner Thorolf Thuestad. From 2008 and until March 2014, Alwynne was Artistic Director of the Borealis festival in Bergen and from 2001 until 2008, she taught composition at Trinity College of Music in London. Alwynne also worked for many years as a freelance writer and presenter for BBC Radio 3. In January 2016, she took up the position of Artistic Director of the BIT20 Ensemble.

is a musician and artist from Tromsø, currently based in Bergen. With the projects Alog and Phonophani he became a prominent representatives of experimental electronic music from Norway, with a string of releases on the label Rune Grammofon. He has also produced a series of site-specific pieces and artworks. These projects include a multichannel composition for the 50-year anniversary of the completion of the chapel of Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp, France, and a special ‘Building Instruments’ performance at the 2008 Manifesta Biennial. He has had solo exhibitions Dead Language Poetry at Bergen Kunsthall 2013 and The Weed Archive at Nikolaj Kunsthal 2015. Eide has also been involved in a series of art projects associated with topics relating to the Barents and Arctic regions of Northern Norway and Russia, including commissions for the Neiden museum (‘Language Memory’) and the University of Tromsø (‘Material Vision – Silent Reading’), Dark Ecology (Sonic Acts) and the ongoing experiments of the ‘Rural Reading Room’ events in the area.
In addition to making music and art, Eide has also been directing the Trollofon electronic music festival in Bergen (2001-2006), and worked as artistic developer at BEK (Bergen Center of Electronic Arts). He is a member of theatre-collective Verdensteatret with works performed at the Shanghai Biennial, Exit festival Paris, BAM New York and more.

Since the 1980s, Gerhard Stäbler he has initiated and directed festivals for contemporary music in the Ruhr area, and large scale projects in public spaces and industrial environments (e.g. in New York, Porto, Chicago, Trier, Düsseldorf, Kiev, Vilnius an Würzburg). He was artistic director of the 1995 World Music Days of the ISCM, held in the Ruhr. His works has been commissioned by orchestras, choirs, ensembles and soloists, by broadcasters and theatres around the world. He has been composer in residence and visiting professor at many institutions in North and South America, in Australia, as well as in the Middle and Far East. A series of awards, prizes and scholarships (e.g. Cornelius-Cardew Memorial-Prize, The Japan Foundation scholarship, Duisburger Musikpreis 2003). In 2015 the first English language book on the compositional work of Gerhard Stäbler was published by the American musicologist Paul Attinello. In Bergen Assembly 2016, the new commission ”Dancing Senses” will be premiered by Gerhard Stäbler and the BIT20 ensemble.

is a composer, performer, humanitarian and senior figure in contemporary American music, whose work with improvisation, meditation, electronic music, myth and ritual has profoundly influenced experimentation in music from the 1960s onward. Awarded the John Cage Award in 2012 from the Foundation of Contemporary Arts, Pauline is Distinguished Research Professor of Music at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, and Darius Milhaud Artist-in-Residence at Mills College. She is the founder of “Deep Listening,” also her life practice. In 1989, John Cage remarked: “Through Pauline Oliveros and Deep Listening, I finally know what harmony is... It’s about the pleasure of making music.”

is a composer from Averøya in Western Norway. She has her BA and MA in composition from the Grieg Academy, University in Bergen. She spent one year of her studies at the Chopin Academy in Warsaw. The recent years she has been focusing on what happens in the intersection between electronics and acoustic instruments, and on the visual nature of sound through the creation of sonic landscapes and images.

1. WITHIN.
2. The Sub-Bass Prototone: The Subbass Prototone is co-produced by ZKM Karlsruhe where it was recreated for the New Sensorium exhibition curated by Yuko Hasegawa. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
3. The 0.9. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
4. Drum 1: 4 Iterations on Drums is co-produced by the Chantal Crousel Gallery - Paris. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
5. The Sub-Ink: The Sub-Ink is co-produced by the Experimental Music and Performing Arts Centre (EMPAC) NY with curator Victoria Brooks. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
6. True Laptop. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
7. The TI. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
8. The Ouroboros: The Ouroboros is co-produced by BEK – Bergen Center for Electronic Arts. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
9. 33 Soft-Cells: 33 Soft Cells is co-produced by Kvadrat. Note from Kvadrat: On 33 Soft Cells, Kvadrat’s panels will incorporate electronics between their front textile and acoustic absorbent layer, to become one of Atoui’s instruments. Committed to pushing the boundaries, Kvadrat collaborates with visionary talents, who work with art, music, sound design and acoustics. Kvadrat Soft Cells are dedicated to enhancing the sound quality of interior spaces and to enabling architects to realize their acoustic and aesthetic visions. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
10. The Sound Massage Kit: The Sound Massage kit is co-produced by the Chantal Crousel Gallery - Paris. Courtesy Bergen Assembly, Photo: Thor Brødreskift.
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