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Asiatic (or "Chinese") ladybugs – the ones with yellow instead of red dots – were brought into Europe in large quantities during the last decades as a natural insecticide (they eat ten times as many lice as their European relatives). Because they are flourishing so well, they are now considered to be an "invasive" species by many who fear they might draw back the "native" European ladybug species. But the total number of ladybugs Romain Nattier and his colleagues count in the region of Île-de-France doesn't indicate such a drawback or decline of numbers. Taking his special research field of the European ladybug species as a focal point, Romain Nattier questions the categories of migration, homeland and territorialisms of all sorts in plant and animal populations. Instead of describing movements of the Asiatic ladybug as anthropogenic species migration, he would rather understand them as a "change of distribution pattern due to human activities." And instead of seeing it as a problem of migration, he proposes to understand those spatial movements as part of evolution.

expert

  • Romain Nattier

date

21/11/2015

lieu

Musée de l’Homme, Paris

est entomologiste, systématicien et biologiste au Muséum national d'Histoire Naturelle. Son travail porte sur l'origine et la structure de la diversité biologique. Il s’est particulièrement intéressé à la diversification des espèces de coccinelles en Europe à long et à court terme.

— ENQUÊTE : Devenir terriens
— PRODUCTION : Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— ÉVÉNEMENT : Devenir terriens : dialogues et exercices pour rétrécir et étendre l’humain

est entomologiste, systématicien et biologiste au Muséum national d'Histoire Naturelle. Son travail porte sur l'origine et la structure de la diversité biologique. Il s’est particulièrement intéressé à la diversification des espèces de coccinelles en Europe à long et à court terme.

— ENQUÊTE : Devenir terriens
— PRODUCTION : Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— ÉVÉNEMENT : Devenir terriens : dialogues et exercices pour rétrécir et étendre l’humain

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