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As the Inuit (one Inuk, two Inuit) live on the North Pole, they bear indeed much more impacts of climate change. With the permanent ice floes vanishing, now up to 50 % since 1979, the global warming is sped up since the ice is not reflecting the sunlight. The CO2 gasses on their part accelerate this system and make it a vicious circle. The Inuit, still being hunter-gatherers, are faced with the diminishing of the seasonal ice floes. It makes the sea more violent. It also makes it impossible for them to travel from one village to another or even to hunt. And the diminishing of snow also makes it hard to hunt trails, to travel and to build igloos. This know-how is thus getting lost. Their third problem is the infrastructure that collapses, now that the permafrost is becoming less consistent. Sylvie Teveny predicts that the Inuit won’t migrate, but rather adapt to this hardened situation. They see themselves as trailblazers, already facing the difficulties that await us.

expert

  • Sylvie Teveny

date

21/11/2015

lieu

Musée de l’Homme, Paris

est ethnologue. Diplômée en langue et culture Inuit de l’Inalco, elle a réalisé plusieurs missions de terrain dans l’Arctique canadien. Depuis plus de quinze ans, elle est directrice de l’association Inuksuk - espace culturel inuit de Paris.

— ENQUÊTE : Devenir terriens
— PRODUCTION : Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— ÉVÉNEMENT : Devenir terriens : dialogues et exercices pour rétrécir et étendre l’humain

est ethnologue. Diplômée en langue et culture Inuit de l’Inalco, elle a réalisé plusieurs missions de terrain dans l’Arctique canadien. Depuis plus de quinze ans, elle est directrice de l’association Inuksuk - espace culturel inuit de Paris.

— ENQUÊTE : Devenir terriens
— PRODUCTION : Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge No. 18
— ÉVÉNEMENT : Devenir terriens : dialogues et exercices pour rétrécir et étendre l’humain

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